Author: Mercury Twenty

Contemporary art gallery in Oakland, CA

NEW PUBLIC ART BOOK!

AC Transit’s BRT TEMPO Line 7 year long public art project with Lead Artist Johanna Poethig and Mildred Howard with Peter Richards and Joyce Hsu is now featured in a book featuring photographs by Lewis Watts and Raymond Holbert and an essay including interviews with the artists by Leila Weefur. This document collects this 9 mile artwork for 34 Stations and almost 300 connected unique works of art into a layout that reveals its flow of ideas, images and materials.

The book is available through emailing johanna@johannapoethig.com.

You can see a PDF of the book on the website here: https://johannapoethig.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/ACT-BRT-Cultural-CorridorUrban-Flow.pdf?189db0&189db0

Cultural Corridor/Urban Flow is a 9 mile public art work created by the Team Johanna Poethig (a Mercury 20 Gallery artist), Mildred Howard, Peter Richards, Joyce Hsu which employs a ribbon of words and neighborhood iconography to enhance the new AC Transit Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Line that connects downtown Oakland, International Boulevard, to San Leandro. Workshops with Oakland’s “Youth Uprising”, San Leandro residents and the broader community, informed, inspired and guided the artists design process. Local poet and writer Elmaz Abinader contributed to the text as it was developed resulting in a 9 mile long poem. Light responsive honeycomb-hex panels, designed for the Enhanced Stations, punctuates the lively visual environment as they respond to people and vehicles moving by. Each Station is a landmark riffing on the unique cultural and social environment of the surrounding neighborhood. Cultural Corridor/Urban Flow considers transportation in the context of all the human constructed systems which enable us to live and prosper on this planet. Moving people and goods freely from one place to another, along with education, communication, commerce, clean water, energy, waste management are just a few of the ways we have devised to provide for fulfilling lives. A sign of a healthy society is when all of these systems flow together in harmony. This is an unfolding work of art that offers a continuous experience of discovery along the TEMPO BRT route.

 

Video Profile of Elizabeth Sher included as part of the Bay Area Women Artists Legacy Project

The Bay Area Women Artists (BAWAP) Legacy Project’s mission is to highlight women’s historically significant  and much under-documented and under-valued  contributions to the Bay Area art scene. This thirty women strong organization is working diligently to compile an archive as a resource for future generations that represents the many active and talented female artists who played active roles in the arts over the past fifty years.  One of the most engaging components of BAWAP’s practice is the creation of a series of video interviews that explores not only the key figures’ extensive art practice, exhibition history, and active involvement in feminist art groups, but also the challenges they overcame as they staked their territory in a male dominated landscape.

In one particularly compelling dialogue, BAWAP member Susan Leibovitz Steinman engages her former professor and mentor, Mercury Twenty’s Elizabeth Sher, in a frank discussion of her long career trajectory.  Sher relates her transfer to Berkeley in the early 60s as a college Junior from the East Coast, and being confronted with sexism and a complete lack of women mentors.  The conversation touches upon the struggles Sher overcame balancing the demands of motherhood, her teaching career, and her continued development as an artist. From this experience Sher’s search for community and a new model of engagement with the public ultimately led to a significant, award winning exploration of film-making that parallels her still ongoing multi-media and two dimensional work.  The inclusion of Steinman’s video in the BAWAP archive will ensure that Sher’s role as a fine artist with work in major museums and important mentor for many generations of students during her forty-year teaching career at California College of the Arts will be preserved for future generations of art scholars and curators.


Peter Honig in SF Cameraworks’ Book and Zine Fair

“Principles of Failure”
Peter’s second book of photographs, is included in San Francisco Cameraworks’ Book and Zine Fair, which will be happening online Thursday, December 17th from 4-7 pm.
Comprised of still life studio photographs of found object accumulated over the course of the last twenty years, it humorously explores themes of mortality, the nature of self reflection, human relationships, and the passage of time. All of the big heavy themes tidied up in a little paperback.
You can browse the little book online (and purchase if you desire) here

Peter Honig participating in “Nature Wills Us On”

“Path”

“Path” by Peter Honig is one of four images included in an online exhibition “Nature Wills Us On”.

We are happy to share with you the current exhibition “Nature Wills Us On” by Curator Gwenda Joyce. She has assembled the work of eight artists “faced with existential challenges …[who]… turn to nature for renewal, comfort, beauty, and respite.”

The exhibition continues on through this Sunday, December 13th.

Visible at https://www.artworkarchive.com/rooms/gwenda-joyce/6f03e1

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today

“Specialist Murphy” 52 x 62  oil and graphite on panel  2016

We would like to send a big congratulations to Julianne Wallace Sterling ~ a Mercury 20 Gallery Artist whom has been selected as a finalist in The Outwin: Amercian Portraiture Today. A major exhibit to feature timely portraits on socio-political themes.

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today a major exhibition from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery featuring the finalists of its fifth triennial Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition.  Every three years, artists living and working in the United States are invited to submit one of their recent portraits to a panel of experts chosen by the Portrait Gallery. In 2019, nearly 50 works were selected from over 2,600 entries in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, time-based media and performance art.  The resulting presentation reflects the compelling and diverse approaches that today’s artists are using to tell the American story through portraiture. Finalists have come from 14 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today features intimate depictions of individuals whose remarkable stories are rooted in the most pressing challenges of our time,” said Kim Sajet, director of the National Portrait Gallery. “Many of the leading national conversations from the past three years—immigration, the rights of workers, climate change and the impact of racial violence—are presented here on a personal level. It is a moment to stop, look around and admire the tenacity and beauty of the American spirit through portraiture.”

The latest edition of The Outwin addresses themes of socio-political relevance, including immigration, Black Lives Matter, adolescence, the status of American workers, gun violence and LGBTQ+ rights.

The jurors for the 2019 Competition were Harry Gamboa Jr., artist, writer and co-director of the program in photography and media at the California Institute of the Arts; Lauren Haynes, curator of contemporary art at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; Byron Kim, artist and senior critic at the Yale School of Art; and Jefferson Pinder, artist and professor of sculpture and contemporary practices at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Three Portrait Gallery curators also served on the committee: Taína Caragol, curator of painting and sculpture and Latino art and history; Dorothy Moss, curator of painting and sculpture and performance art; and Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator emerita.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, available at the Springfield Museums Store.

Congratulations Mary Curtis Ratcliff

With great excitement we share the news that Mary Curtis Ratcliff won first prize in the 2020 Berkeley video and Film Festival in the “Elder Producer” category for her Healing Circle Artworks video. This is yet another great accomplishment to add to her long and noteworthy career.

The Healing Circle Artworks video is used as a tool to help relieve stress and restore inner balance. It features a guided relaxation meditation led by James Baraz, author of “Awakening Joy,” soothing music and nature sounds composed by Jason Reinier, and visuals of Ratcliff’s kinetic sculptures, which are also inspired by nature. May it continue to be a healing force for so many. During these exceptionally stressful times it is essential that we all hold space for calm and continue to nurture our well being. This short video is designed to do just that. It is 5 minutes of serenity for the soul. Feel free to share the video with anyone that you know that could benefit from it.

Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUmzg6vRoX8&feature=youtu.be&ab_channel=PeterSamis

Mercury 20 Welcomes Jessica Cadkin

We are thrilled to introduce Jessica Cadkin as the newest member of Mercury 20. Jessica is a Bay Area artist whose work has appeared in group shows internationally and throughout Northern California, including at Mercury Twenty Gallery. Her work has exhibited at Headlands Center for the Arts, Southern Exposure, di Rosa Preserve, Bedford Gallery, Root Division, and the Berkeley Art Center. She recently had a piece in an exhibit at the Bateman Foundation Gallery of Nature in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada and is scheduled to be in a show at NIAD in March of 2021. In addition to being an exhibiting artist, she is an active member of the local arts community. She has been on the board at the Berkeley Art Center since 2016 and has served as board secretary, program committee chair, and is currently the governance chair. Jessica grew up in Napa and received a BA in Sculpture and Painting from San Francisco State University. We are elated to have her as a part of Mercury 20 Gallery and we look forward to seeing what Jessica creates next.

To see some of Jessica’s art please visit https://mercurytwenty.com/artist/jessica-cadkin/

 

M20 Gallery Artists in the De Young Open

Congratulations to Mercury 20 Gallery artists Jill McLennan and Neo Serafimidis for their inclusion in the DeYoung Open, a juried community art exhibition presenting over 1,000 works by Bay Area artists. The show fills the 12,000-square-foot Herbst Exhibition Galleries at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park and is on display through January 3, 2021. The Museum is now open to the public with covid 19 safety measures in place. For more info on the exhibit visit: https://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/de-young-open

See our artists’ work at:

http://www.jillmclennan.me  and  https://neoserafimidis.com/the-sheltering-night

Neo Serafimidis  Bryant. The Sheltering Night series, May 2020.

Neo Serafimidis  Azevedo. The Sheltering Night series, May, 2020.

Jill McLennan  Shee Crane, watercolor, collage and paint pens on wood, 24″x30″ 2019

 

 

 

 


Pantea Karimi selected for San Jose’s Holding the Moment exhibition at San Jose Airport.

Pantea Karimi’s poster California Healing,  featuring her stylized depiction of the medicinal native herb Yarrow ,was selected for Holding the Moment, a group art exhibition  representing the City of San Jose. The exhibition venue is the San Jose airport from Nov 2020-April 2021 and is comprised of the work of painters, muralists, graphic artists, photographers, and poets who address themes that reflect on sheltering in place, scenes from quarantine and its’ impact on the individual, community & society,  and the evolving meanings of community in this unprecedented time.

Yarrow, is a hardy pest and drought resistant plant that grows throughout the Bay Area. It  has been used for thousands of years to treat many conditions, as it has anti-bacterial qualities, improves circulation, and promotes clearing of the respiratory tract. Pantea’s colorful and abstracted depiction of this “multi-talented” herb promotes the connection between the environment and healing, reiterating the interconnectedness of plants and animals. The poster received an award of special distinction among the exhibitors.

The original artwork from which the poster design was adapted from, Endemic Healing iii, Yarrow, CA , is available as a limited edition print on linen photo paper. Available for purchase in our store  .


Pantea Karimi to exhibit at the University of Arizona & published in the UK’s Journal of Mathematics and Arts.

Three of M20’s Pantea Karimi’s Moon artworks have been selected for the Art of Planetary Science exhibition, organized by the science department at the University of Arizona. Imaging the Moon i, Imaging the Moon ii,  & The Infinite Moon i evolved out of her 2019 Mercury Twenty show COUNTDOWN: BIRUNI – GALILEO – APOLLO, which explored about  astronomy and the Moon landing. The exhibition features artwork that is created from scientific data, or incorporates scientific ideas, with the aim of providing a new perspective on the work of scientists and the universe. The yearly exhibit finds common ground between artists and scientists.

In addition, Pantea’s medieval math project An Homage to Khayyam and Pascal  was published in the UK’s Journal of Mathematics and the Arts . The publication, established in 2007,  is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal that deals with relationship between mathematics and the arts.

image: Khayyam-Pascal, Installation view, The Rotch Library at MIT, 2018

Pantea’s work, which began in 2014,  explores the mathematics of medieval Iran, known as The Islamic Golden Age of Science.  She writes of her inspiration for the above image:

“This gave me an opportunity to delve into my origins and place of birth and understand the Persian culture from another perspective. It was here that I came across Pascal’s Triangle. The triangular pattern of binomial coefficients was intensely striking visually, ideal for my work. Digging deeper, I learned that the discovery of binomial coefficients is named after the seventeenth-century French mathematician, Blaise Pascal. However, it emerged that centuries before, Omar Khayyam, the twelfth-century Iranian mathematician and poet, was already studying binomial numbers. In December 2015, The Guardian published an article about a new book, Mathematics and Art: A Cultural History by historian Lynn Gamwell (2016). In her book, Gamwell clearly explains the binomial numbers’ triangle and its history. In Figure 1, each hexagon contains a number which is the sum of the numbers above it. For example, in the last row, the number 792 is the sum of the two numbers 330 + 426. This triangular pattern in Iran is known as Khayyam’s triangle after Omar Khayyam who described the same pattern earlier than Pascal.”


Artist Pantea Karimi in the SF Weekly

 

“The Unbearable Lightness of Mathematics” is a reconstruction of Pantea Karimi’s school life in Iran during the late 1980s. (Photo: Jonathan Curiel)

Black & White

Pantea Karimi’s exhibit at Oakland’s Mercury 20 Gallery, “The Unbearable Lightness of Mathematics,” is a reconstruction of her school life in Iran during the late 1980s, when she struggled with the pressures of science education and struggled with the school administration’s attempts to root out her growing, teenage interest in the music of Madonna and Michael Jackson. A clash was inevitable, and Karimi, who now lives in San Jose, tells visitors how it ended through a sequence of 10 mock blackboards with mathematical formulas that gradually get more cloudy — with the final board almost completely shrouded in a chalky fog.
Iran’s 1979 revolution ushered in strict religious standards, so the Persian wording for “In the Name of God” shouts from each of the 10 blackboards. The first blackboard features a copy of Isaac Newton’s mathematical handwriting alongside Karimi’s Persian handwriting, which she uses to express her concerns about studying math and taking exams. Halfway through the 10 blackboards, two clouded photos of Iran’s religious leaders oversee the blackboards and a trove of Karimi’s personal objects from that time, such as Reebok sneakers and cassette tapes of U.S. pop stars.
The blackboards’ interplay of cloudy chalk, Persian lettering, and math formulas — and their sequential morphing from clearly visible to almost nothingness — is a kind of visual existentialism. This aspect of the work is underscored by the dark boards’ setting: a cavernous, white-walled space.
More than a decade ago, Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel and accompanying film, Persepolis, made the world smile and cringe at her former life in Iran, including her student life. “The Unbearable Lightness of Mathematics” produces a similar effect — only this time, we’re asked to physically stand in a place that mirrors what Karimi felt three decades ago. The mirror gets fuzzy in places. But even hazy images produce meanings that are crystal clear.

“The Unbearable Lightness of Mathematics”
Free, Through Oct. 17
Mercury 20 Gallery, 475 25th St., Oakland
mercurytwenty.com

Artists Staying Active

Mercury 20 Artist Christine Meuris will be the Digital Artist in Residence at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles from October through December 2020.  She will be the first artist to pioneer this Covid-19 adaptation of the regular SJMQT-AIR program.
In this three month appointment, Christine will prepare us to say a not-so-fond farewell to a very difficult year through a workshop, a collective mail art project and an offering of that project back to nature at the edge of the continent, Ocean Beach.

Sheltering in the Studio with Mary Curtis Ratcliff

Mary Curtis Ratcliff is another long-standing member of M20, having joined the Gallery in 2008.

Curtis has been hard at work in her studio preparing for her February 2021 exhibition. For many months, due to the quarantine, her usual working process was interrupted by the fact she was cut off from her collaborator, master printer Tony Molatore of Berkeley Giclée .  She reports that she was left to scrounge in the back of her flat file drawers, where all the trimmings from previous digital inkjet prints of her photos had been saved. Indeed, these scraps proved so fertile that so far she she has made over 26 works in the series she has dubbed “ScrapWorks”.

Portal (left) is composed of corners culled from over a dozen different previous works.
Portal, 2020
collage of digital inkjet prints and acrylic on Tyvek
36 x 36 in.
More of Curtis’ work can be seen on her personal website and
additionally she has some very affordable offerings available on our online store .
The community eagerly awaits her February show to witness the latest evolution of her work that has spanned various genres- Video, Dance, Sculpture, Photography, Painting, Printmaking, Public Art, and Installation.

 

Until then…we leave you with a great interview from our Archives with M20’s Kathleen King (2008).

Can you remember any art that moved you when you were really young?

Once we went to Cranbrook when I was maybe about 8. I came across this big thing: it was horizontal, it had holes in it, had a sort of head-like form. I didn’t know what it was. It was interesting and attractive to me, and I kept saying, “What is that thing?” Well, they told me it was a Henry Moore sculpture.

Sounds like you were interested in natural forms, abstracted form. Even though you didn’t know what this piece was, it drew your attention.

It’s not too surprising that sculpture was the first type of art that I made. I did sculpture for about 25 years before I started the mixed media on paper work I do currently.

Did you do sculpture at RISD?

Yes, I majored in Sculpture and then Art Education my senior year. I really got into sculpture after I left New York City.

After college, I was into the early video scene in NYC.  I was one of the 3 founding members of VideoFreex which later became a collective. I had spent 4 years in Europe, 6 on the East Coast, and with VideoFreex, I came out to California to document the avant garde movement of the late 60s on assignment for CBS News. That’s when I knew that there was someplace else to explore if I ever left New York.

I came back out here in ’73 and I thought, OK, I went to art school, what did I major in, oh yeah sculpture! I’ll do some sculpture now. (Laughs) But the important thing is that once I started making art, even with all the low paying or teaching jobs I’ve had since that time, I never stopped making my art.  I always found a way to do it.

I wanted to make large sculpture, but I made a rule that I had to be able to pick them up myself. I didn’t want anything to do with a forklift, Cor-ten steel, stone, big chunks of wood, or having to ask someone to help me. So, I designed these large sculptures that were very light weight.

What were they made out of?

Hoops and ribbons. They were about 12 feet long and kinetic. One of the biggest, a triple hoop piece, was called Hollywood Car Wash.  They were made from Japanese ribbon, which was the cheapest material I could find; it came on huge rolls. Then I went to fabric ribbons: satins, taffetas, rayons. The sculptures went from being suspended in the air to being wall mounted. I hung them all over the place, at the Oakland Museum, the Legion of Honor.

After that, I began doing large abstract goddess sculptures, about 6 feet tall.

How did you get into making goddess figures?

In the mid-70s there was a beginning of the Goddess movement in the Bay Area and I was very interested in it. In 1978 there was a big conference at UC Santa Cruz. Carol Christ from Harvard was one of the keynote speakers, and she spoke about the re-emergence of the Great Goddess and its importance as a development in the history of religion. One of my sculptures hung over the stage at that conference.

My sculptures were also used as part of Goddess ceremonies, in processions and various performance pieces. I did performance art myself at that time, and designed sculpture to be used in ceremony and performance.

I know you travel extensively and I think you went to Malta to study the goddess culture there.

I went with Jennifer Berezan on a pilgrimage to the 6000-year-old goddess temples in Malta. First, I had to look on the map because, gosh, we had these tickets and I had to say, “Where is Malta?”

(Laughs) Really, just exactly where is it?

It’s an island south of Sicily, east of Tunisia, in the Mediterranean. 6000 years ago there was a cult worshipping the Goddess there, and they built numerous stone temples. I did a series of 2-dimensional works inspired by my trip there. Prints and mixed-media.

You did sculpture for almost 25 years and then you moved into doing prints and other 2-dimensional work. Tell me how that evolved.

Helene Aylon, an artist and friend of mine from New York, encouraged me to do this residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in Sweet Briar, Virginia. She thought I’d really love the place, and she kept after me for about five years. I hesitated because, being a sculptor, I hated schlepping all my materials to a far off place to create work, and then have to schlep it all back. My partner Peter suggested that I apply for the residency and just simply do something different while I was there. That started a whole new way of working for me.

I was doing a sculpture series about cakes at the time. So, the first thing that I took up when I got to the Virginia Center residency was drawing. After about a week I decided I wanted to paint, too.  I found some wallpaper sample books and began cutting cake shapes out of them and collaging those onto painted backgrounds. That was the transition from 3d to 2d right there. I was doing cake sculptures up to that point. It grew into the 2D painted collages of cakes, then it took off from there.

I went back for a second time a couple of years later, and I decided that I wanted to transfer images onto one another. I had met a wonderful artist Alice Harris from the first residency. I called her up the night before I was supposed to leave and I said, “How do you do this?” She told me the process over the phone from New Jersey. That really changed my practice from painting and collaging to begin to start layering images.

At one point, I did a 4 by 6 foot piece with a printed background. It took me about 5 years to figure out how that piece worked. I kept trying to paint the background but then I realized that I needed to print the background. I realized I could take photos of images for backgrounds. Then on top of that I could transfer, collage, paint and draw. That’s my present work.

I’ve been looking at your recent work in the gallery and it’s interesting how you integrate the layers of imagery with the drawing and painting. You create a new, unique, and I think, mysterious image. It reminds me of that old process of hand coloring a photo, but you don’t just color it in, you work with the images, your coloring responds to them, joins them together…

That’s part of what I’m trying to do with this work, to evoke a sense of mystery and to not be obvious with what things actually are. I’m playing with abstraction and reality.

The viewer can spend a lot of time looking, deconstructing the image in their mind, figuring out what it is.

I’m glad you are seeing it that way, because that’s what I’m trying to do. I want to get the viewer intrigued and engaged with the image. The fun of these images is that it’s not particularly obvious what they are.

I feel like I can wander around the image visually. I’m thinking, “How did she do that?” “Where did that come from?” You are building an image from many images, collaging and transferring in layers, but also you’ve done other interesting things: you’ve transferred a rectangular photo, then added drawing off all four edges, expanding on the photo with drawing. Sometimes you repeat or mirror the image to transform it.

My father had a darkroom when I was growing up. I grew up watching him take photos with this big Graflex and printing them and seeing the results. I have this idea of how to make images from him. I started taking photographs when I was really young, maybe around seven or so, and I’ve never really stopped. They are my archive. Right now on my poor little Mac I have over 5000 images. (Laughs)

The other thing that was neat about my parents is that my mother made all my clothes. She even knitted our sweaters. About a week before she died, I told her, “Mom, you taught me to make sculpture.” And she said, “No, I didn’t.” I said, “Yes, you did!” We would go to the fabric store in Birmingham, Michigan, and we would pick out Butterick or Simplicity patterns, we’d get the fabic, buttons, lace. Then we’d go home, lay it out on the floor and cut it out, then sew it up. We actually made a sculpture—a three-dimensional object—that happened to be a dress.

Her father, my granddad William Curtis Carter (that’s where I got my name) was an engineer. I was surrounded by people making things on a very real level. I picked up on all that stuff.

Tell me some more about the body of work that you’ll show in your upcoming show at Mercury 20, Chosen Terrain. I’m looking at this piece called Waterweb which is fascinating.

I’m showing a large diptych called Parting of the Plates that I made earlier this year. It’s 80 inches long by 30 inches high. It starts with a photograph that I made of some elliptical circles I found in a botanical garden in Maine. I photographed them in such a way that I created a third circle in the middle. I printed them very big and I started painting and layering all sorts of things on top of them, creating maybe 4 or 5 different layers.

What kinds of things did you layer?

Other photographs—of birds, a Japanese garden, a reflection of a tree in a pond.

Is that the image you used in Waterweb, the tree in the pond? I was not sure if that was a double exposure or how the tree got into the water…

I was doing a residency in New Zealand this February, and I took hundreds of photos, some of which resulted in pieces in the show. Waterweb uses a photo of a creek. On top of that I transferred a photo of a spider web in a fence. Then I drew in colored pencil over that. I had been trying to photograph spider webs for years but it’s a hard shot to get. One morning in New Zealand, we took a walk on the farm next door. Droplets of rain and dew had been caught in this web, illuminating it. Photographing it against a dark tree in the distance, I could actually see the web structure.

I love the fence, which is also a grid and a nice counterpoint to the web. And it’s a hand-knotted fence which is so beautifully crafted.

The joinery of the fence is like nothing we have in this country. I had to draw each one of the joints in by hand. I had to really study how the metal was tied.

It’s a lovely piece and I enjoy looking at it.

Part of my challenge with the residencies has been traveling with my work. In 2000, I was in a show in Osaka, Japan. I heard horror stories about artist’s work that never made it through customs, so I wanted to make some work that I could carry with me on the plane. I designed a sculpture that is about 6 feet high by 6 feet in diameter, which I will show at Mercury 20. This piece is called Debabalizer. It’s like a big tinker toy, made of wooden dowels and joints. It’s in the form of a four-tiered cake. I had the phrase The Dream of a Common Language, which is from an Adrianne Rich poem, translated into 5 languages—Japanese, Arabic, Hindi, Greek and Russian. Paper flags are hanging down from the dowels on the top tiers of the sculpture, with the phrases are transferred onto them. The third tier down has the words earth-air-fire-water on it. On the bottom tier, I photographed the hands of a friend who does sign language, spelling out the phrase.

What is it about that cake form, or ziggaraut shape? Is it the Tower of Babel from the Bible?

It has to do with the circles and hoops. I know I’ve been influenced by experiences I had as far back as 1972 when I went to the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. I met Leonard Crow Dog who was head medicine man for the American Indian Movement at the time. I witnessed a Sun Dance ceremony there, which is done in a circular form. After that I began to use a lot of circles in my work; it’s a universal symbol but the Native American culture has been most influential to me.

You have really traveled a lot.

All my life I’ve traveled and lived in other countries. My next trip is to Quebec. I’m really looking forward to using my French. They are having their 400th anniversary, and there should be all kinds of great art to see.

That sounds like fun. Of all the places you’ve been, what’s been the most life changing?

I think the experience of going to India was life-changing. It’s like going to another planet. I went around the world in 2002, and that was one of the most memorable places I’ve been.

Many goddesses to look at in India.

For sure, so many goddesses (Laughs)

What’s on the horizon for you after the Mercury 20 show with Jamie Morgan in September?

I’m busy! I have another travel challenge. I’m having a solo show at the Hess Gallery on the campus of Pine Manor College. That’s where I went to school before I went to RISD. Unfortunately, they have no budget for me to transport my work (Laughs). The gallery is large, too, so I was wondering what to do to fill it up? I thought I would try something new, have my background images printed onto canvas, which I can roll and transport less expensively. That’s what I’m working on now.

I’ll be in a show at the Berkeley Art Center in 2009. A group show with various artists who worked at the New Pacific Center in New Zealand. And, I’ll have a two-person show in a gallery in El Cerrito showing my paper doll series. Then East Bay Open Studios, and then in July another show at Mercury 20.

Mary Curtis Ratcliff

 


Interview with Mercury Twenty Artist Charlie Milgrim

Artist Charlie Milgrim is one of five M20 members who have been with the Gallery since nearly its’ inception in 2007

Here’s an interview with Kathleen King from 2008.

We encourage you to check out her newer work at her recently relaunched website .

She is also selling reasonably priced prints online in our store

 

 

 

 

 

Interview with Kathleen King

Portrait by Peter Honig

March 6, 2008

 

http://charliemilgrim.com

Tell me where you’re from and something about your childhood.
I was born and grew up in New York City. My father was a concert pianist, who stayed home and practiced every day, and my mother was a college professor.

Did the fact that your father was a musician and your mother an educator influence you? How did you come to be an artist?
I did study music, took private violin lessons and played clarinet in the junior high school band (laughs) but I knew I didn’t want to be a musician. I realized early on there was a calling for me that had to do with art. Even when I was about five years old, I felt that things that I drew were really important.

So you got into art through drawing?
I wasn’t sure why, but my drawings were the most meaningful things for me when I was growing up. They are what sparked me, but I didn’t really find my way with art until my teens.

You came out to the west coast for college?
I went to The California College of Arts and Crafts, where I focused on glassblowing and metalwork. I loved the fire arts! I studied with Marvin Lipofsky and Dennis Leon. This was when I first got interested in sculpture. The techniques and processes really fascinated me. It was all new and wonderfully challenging.

Then you went to UC Berkeley for graduate school?
I did. But in between the two, there were a number of years where I did window display, and installations for New Wave clubs. This was a very formative period. I loved the immediacy of putting up a display and getting feedback. It’s very much like doing installation—many artists cut their teeth on window display—Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol. It was good groundwork for what I do now, which is working with space and visuals.

Growing up in New York I saw fantastic window display all the time—and a lot of art. My mother had a membership to the MOMA and we went often. I liked all the art at the MOMA when I was young, but my biggest, early influences were Duchamp and Cornell.

So through Duchamp you became interested in conceptual sculpture, which is a big part of your work now.
Papa Duchamp was also the patron saint of many artists here in the Bay Area. I was also influenced by the work of David Ireland, Paul Kos, Ann Hamilton and Rebecca Horn.

I see an affinity with your work and that of Paul Kos. The simplicity; the way you both hone it down to the symbols, objects, space, and let them all play together.
I studied a fair amount in the time between art school and graduate school. I basically educated myself during that period. I also traveled extensively, hung around and attended a lot of lectures the SF Art Institute. It’s interesting how all that developed in my own work. I don’t always see all the influences but I guess that they are there.

My work comes from another place I can’t really identify. Images often come through a glimpse. I don’t deeply meditate about them. Often the objects I find inform me of the direction of the work.

How did you get into using found objects in your work?
That came out of the window display, because I was constantly collecting objects and putting them together, so my dialog with “things” grew out of that. The task of attracting attention to sell products became another dilemma for me. I felt it was really important to communicate what I was passionate about. I realized that instead of selling products I could sell ideas, environmental and political action. I understood that because people were so influenced by advertising, that this form gave me a way in, a way to communicate or “advertise” my ideas to people. That was my original impetus for it.

Early on I did a piece called Pretty Hands and Feet, which I made in a wooden box that contained bottles of this product called Pretty Hands and Feet.

Oh, I know that product. (laughs)
I put this cheesy Renoir-like print with dainty hands and feet in as a backdrop, next to several bottles of pickled pig’s feet, I liked the ironic interplay between these commercial products.

I traveled to Egypt in 1987, it was an amazing experience. I was really moved by the power of the scale of the monuments. When I came back, I wanted to bring that narrative in, so I did a few pieces using pyramid forms. I did a whole series called Secrets of the Pyramids. One day I was driving up San Pablo Ave. and I ran across about a hundred huge machine nuts, they must have fallen off a truck, so I parked, and collected them all and I made a pyramid piece out of them. There was also a stuffed iguana in that piece. I found weird relationships between the pyramids and stuff I found in my everyday environment.

You must have felt the strangeness of the ancient place of Egypt and the modern place you came back to live in.
It was really emotional and dramatic for me to see the cradle of civilization and all the art which has been preserved for thousands of years. It was important to me to see the immense value this art had to its civilization. It made me more driven and determined as an artist after witnessing the power of Egyptian art in its context.

So you went from this pyramid shape which is elemental, to being well-known for working with the sphere, more specifically, the bowling ball. How did that come about?
That came out of a trip as well. I took a drive across country with Ray Beldner—an artist who was a big influence, a collaborator, and my husband at the time. We were making a hand-held film we called The Magical Misery Tour. We went to various environmentally toxic hotspots like coal-fired electric plants which were blamed for acid rain, Nevada silver mines where birds were being killed by cyanide gases just by flying over them, that kind of thing.  It was amazing that we got access to a lot of places, being young, innocent-looking student types, they let us in and talked to us very frankly sometimes, and sometimes not so frankly.

One of the places we went on this trip was Carlsbad, New Mexico. Near there, the US Government planned to bury nuclear waste, which would be trucked in from all over the US. So here I had gone to the desert of Egypt and now I was in the American desert, which seemed to me like a very sacred place, but they were planning to defile it and basically create an environmental disaster. My first bowling ball piece, Carlsbad Lanes, getting back to that (laughs) was an installation sponsored by Haines Gallery at 49 Geary. There was a huge unused space in that building which had been a Western Union Telegram station. Cheryl Haines got about 10 artists together to do installations in this raw space before it was re-fashioned into upscale art galleries. I went in and saw a black stripe of linoleum on the floor that cut through the space, and I immediately envisioned the piece. I decided to make a bowling alley and use it as a metaphor for the burying of nuclear waste. I used 50 gallon drums as bowling pins so the scale was extreme. I got real bowling balls and sandblasted the words Earth, Air, Water and Fire on them. I covered the drums with salt, because that’s what they were planning to do, bury the drums of nuclear waste in salt! I was so disturbed about this after that trip; I did this first bowling ball piece in response.

Did you then just get entranced with the bowling balls?
By that time I was in graduate school and about eight months after I did the first piece, I finally did fall in love with the balls. I did a piece with two music stands. I put them up against the wall, and I put two bowling balls on them and they held; they just balanced by gravity up against the wall! It just amazed me, that these very heavy, perfectly round objects could be held by almost nothing at all. After that they were all I could think about. It was the beginning of a love affair that lasted a number of years.

You’ve explored so many aspects of the bowling balls whether it was the weight, their spherical/planetary nature, their likeness to human heads, the fiery patterns that they often have on the surface… 
I use them as metaphors for a lot of different things. I have about 600 of them. I did a piece that the DiRosa Preserve in Napa has where I used 80 black bowling balls. They tend to work best when you use all one color. In Department of Appropriations, I hung 25 bright red balls from the ceiling at Gallery 16. Sometimes I just need a lot at once. (Laughs)

For DiRosa, you did a piece with bowling balls in a bathtub.
Originally I visualized the All For Me piece after my friend David Raymond offered me a gaudy spa to do an installation at the Trident Hotel Art Expo in San Francisco. All the bowling balls were sandblasted with the word “ME”, it was a piece about ridiculous opulence. This is where Rene saw the work. When it was first installed at the Preserve it was staged in a claw foot tub and put in an outdoor area. I discovered a huge marble spa in Rene’s former home at the DiRosa Preserve, where he let me move it, so now its site is much closer to my original idea of the piece as a metaphor for decadence.

You also did one where the tub is upended and all the balls are spilling out.

That’s called Spill and it’s about water issues.

That’s great. I love what you do and how you are not heavy-handed with your politics. You use humor very subtly, and I wonder how you feel about humor in art and the way you approach that?
Growing up in New York, everything had to be funny, and if it wasn’t funny it didn’t exist! It’s culturally part of the way my brain got wired. Humor is a key – a way to get people to follow what you’re saying. Like art, humor is what separates us from lower life forms.

Well, humor is an art. It’s one of the classic arts but people don’t think of it that way so much anymore. It’s not easy to make people laugh, or think. Humor is connecting disparate things and surprising people.
It’s a way to make a connection. I did a couple of pieces called Nice Jugs and Nice Set. Those started when I was in a junk store called Economy Corner. Actually, it’s where Rock, Paper, Scissors Gallery is now. I saw this jug when I was in there and I said to myself, “Ooh, nice jug.” (Laughs)

(Laughs) And you cracked yourself up.
Yeah, I cracked myself up and I thought, oh my god, this is slang that I heard when I was growing up. So of course I got two of them and hung them on a wall in conjunction with some movie marquee letters and pawed out letters. That was in the SF Art Institute’s Nine Bay Area Women show.

Gender is another theme that your work often touches on?
It’s there. I let the work go in a lot of directions. At the root though, I need to make something formally interesting out of it. All the elements need to come together.

A technical question: you sandblast words on to the objects you use. How do you do that?
I cut a vinyl mask, form it to the object, then I use a sandblaster, which is a high -pressure air gun that shoots sand, and slowly erodes the material. You do it in a sealed box so that the sand doesn’t fly all over, or get in or on you. It’s like a paint sprayer but at a much higher velocity.

What are you working on for your April show at Mercury 20?
I’m drawn to aggression—missiles and guns—it’s in the zeitgeist, so I’m doing some work with that. Of course we are a country at war right now, which is being swept under the rug and hidden behind a veil of technology and economic prosperity…

Lack of journalism?
Yeah, grey journalism and everything deceptive. The latest work is about war and peace, aggression and dissent. The show will be called Homeland. So we are working with all those issues. It’s going to be clear in intent, but poetic. People won’t be clubbed over the head when they enter the gallery. But that’s what I’m after—to work politically, and poetically, and always with irony.

 

view Charlie Milgrim’s website


Artists Staying Active

Mercury 20 Gallery artists Mary Curtis Ratcliff and Elizabeth Sher have been included in the newly published Bay Area Women Artists’ Legacy Project Book.

The Bay Area Women Artists (BAWA) Legacy Project aims to both safeguard and highlight women’s contribution to Bay Area art. They believe that an understanding of the local art scene in the past 50 years requires a full examination of women’s contributions and that this possibility will be lost unless art institutions, curators, and historians join in an effort to preserve the legacy of Bay Area women artists.

The statistics are alarming. As the Guerrilla Girls and others have clearly shown, women continue to be under-represented in museum shows and collections and undervalued at art auctions. One consequence is that few women are able to afford the creation of a foundation to oversee their legacy. Institutional support is needed. BAWA has opened a dialogue on this issue. Their members have been practicing art for more than 20 years and have shown extensively. In addition, many have been active in feminist art groups since the 1970s, helping to increase the visibility of women artists throughout the Bay Area.

 

California Sunset, a 52 x 42 inch painting by Mercury 20 Gallery member Tara Esperanza is included in the 10th annual group show California Dreaming: Finding Beauty in My Own Backyard. The exhibition will run September 16 – December 11, 2020 at The Village Theatre Art Gallery in Danville California. The show was juried by Shelley Barry, principal at Slate Contemporary Gallery, Oakland. Initially this exhibit was planned for in-person viewing, but due to Covid 19 and the Contra Costa County health guidelines, it is now online until further notice.

Tara says…. “I am deeply drawn to succulents. I love their character. How they change throughout the seasons. The abundant varieties of texture, color, and shape. I paint large canvases of small succulents. I find interesting compositions and celebrate the beauty of the plants. I love how the succulents share space. Lean on each other, or hold each other up. Succulents bring me joy and I see them as divine in nature.

 

Mercury 20 Gallery member Andrea Brewster has had three sculptures accepted for the Headford Lace Project’s show in Ireland, The Space Between. The exhibition will taking place in October and will take the form of an art trail around the town with lace/artwork exhibited in various locations and curated window displays.

The history of lace is a fascinating story and one which is full of contradictions. It was and still is used to make christening gowns to welcome new born babies, but is also used to make coffin cloths and mourning veils at the end of life. Making lace was considered an appropriate pastime for ladies of high moral stature but also used to ‘reform’ women of low moral values. From a visual perspective, lace is made up of both open and solid spaces where equal importance is placed on that which does not exist, as is placed on the threads that holds it all together. Lace provided a sense of independence as women could earn a living from selling their work. However, lace is also associated with the forced labor of women living in state run institutions who worked without remuneration. Lacemaking is a traditional practice which has been embedded into the social and economic history of countries worldwide for generations. Yet lace is still used as a source of inspiration by contemporary makers who continue to innovate and progress our understanding of what lace is and what lace is considered to be. The Space Between will explore these ambiguities.

Andrea says… “I began tatting because I had seen it discussed in some old handicrafts books and I was intrigued by the process; seduced by its delicate fineness of line. I later discovered that my grandmother was an avid tatter. I began to see tatting as drawing in space with thread and knots and I questioned why tatting is, seen as a fussy, handicraft from a bygone era? Why has it, as (often) anonymous “women’s work”, become so undervalued, so unappreciated? My explorations have primarily led me to investigate three-dimensional forms in tatting. I am particularly intrigued by the underlying mathematical order found in nature, especially among corals and marine invertebrates. Although my work is improvisational, I have used these types of repeating patterns, hyperbolic geometry and logarithmic scales, as a foundation to “grow” forms out of a predictable order. I feel that tatting is experiencing something of a renaissance, brought back from the brink of extinction by the Internet, which has facilitated connection and sharing of patterns and techniques on a global scale. But, despite this renewed interest, tatting remains an under-recognized technique, and still labors under the heavy weight of its cultural reference of old ladies making useless domestic bric-a-brac. However, I feel that the time is ripe for expansion both technically and conceptually; for pushing boundaries and exploring new, uncharted territories across the entire map of tatting possibilities.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

These likenesses from photographer Peter Honig are available for purchase online at Mercury 20 Gallery

There are all types of people. I love spending time with some of them, like my niece Lola, who loves to inline skate…

Lola Rollerblading, archival giclée print on watercolor stock, 2017

Others one admires from afar, like the elegant Lady d’Arbanville, for their alluring aloofness

Lady D’Arbanville, archival giclée print on watercolor stock, 2013

Some have incredible fashion sense, like this person testifying under oath, with over-sized bangle…

Oath (woman w/ over-sized bangle), archival giclée print on watercolor stock, 2015

Some characters I don’t admire so much, as much as I wish they’d put their pants back on…

Sentry, archival pigment print, 2014

Some friends of mine are philosophical in nature, like my college roommate, who skulks around with all sorts of excuses…he’s a lovable, verbose loser. He’s still fun to hang around with…

Principles of Failure, archival pigment print, 2017

As much as I find these folks fascinating on their own, when you put two people together, things get interesting.

Portrait of the Artist and His Wife, archival giclée print on watercolor stock, 2015

The Embrace, archival pigment print, 2017

Three Pieces of Metal, archival pigment print, 2017

Yes, I think Stephen Stills said it best –Love the one you’re with!

New Members at Mercury 20

 

Christine at her exhibit Aug 2020
Christine Meuris joined Mercury 20 Gallery in October 2019. In her recent work, Christine focuses on translating traditional home based arts executed in fabric and fiber into works on paper. In so doing she distills the elements of pattern, color, geometry and symmetry. The intent of this work is to shed a light on and to consider the power of humble things in a time of political upheaval: the pattern behind the needlepoint; the power a line segment not even half and inch long; and the meditative practice of hours spent painting that line segment over and over again.

Christine’s series Biomorphic Bargello (2018-19) is inspired by Bargello needlepoint patterns, which are built by repeating and offsetting a line segment.  These works recall the minimalist movement but are based in the warmth of the decorative arts.

Christine Meuris lives and works in Berkeley, California. She has a B.A. in Environmental Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has participated in juried shows throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and the country and has been invited to participate in groups shows at the Berkeley Art Center, Berkeley Civic Center, The Mosser Hotel, Berkeley Wealth Management and the Roll Up Gallery. She has also had solo shows at Farley’s Café, Hello Stitch Quilting and Sewing Studio, and The Totally Rad Gallery.

 

Andrea installing her window exhibit July 2020
Andrea Brewster joined the gallery in January 2020. Her past work includes mixed media sculpture, drawings, digital media, and fiber sculptures. Her work is often comprised of otherworldly, organic, abstractions, which reference biological life and species. She has been particularly intrigued by the mathematical order underlying growth patterns and often utilizes similar algorithmic systems of repetition to create a predictable order of undulating waves and ripples or packed cell structures.

“I am excited to become a part of the Mercury 20 family and embrace the idea of creating a mutually supportive arts community that benefits both artists/members and patrons; an inclusive space for sharing and exchanging ideas. I highly value that Mercury 20 is providing a means for personal and professional development for artists, while promoting innovative art that can reach a broad audience.”

Andrea has a B.A. in Sculpture from Pomona College, Claremont, CA and an M.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute in New Genres. She was also fortunate to receive a National Endowment for the Arts grant for Works on Paper.  Andrea has exhibited her work throughout the Bay Area, including solo shows at the Lab, and Southern Exposure and in group shows at Chandra Cerrito Gallery, the Lacis Museum of Lace, The Oakland Museum of California, New Langton Arts, and the Peninsula Museum.

 

Tara with painting Purple and Green
Tara Esperanza joined Mercury 20 in May 2020. She is our newest member and she will be showing along side Andrea Brewster and Fernando Reyes October 22nd through November 28th 2020 at the gallery. Tara lives and works in Oakland California. She is currently working on a series of large paintings of succulents. She is interested in the plant personalities. The abundant varieties of texture, color, shape, and how succulents change with the seasons. Tara’s paintings look deep into the plants. She celebrates their diversity. How succulents share space, lean on each other, or hold each other up. They have so much character and Tara aims to bring the viewer in to offer a new perspective and her intimate viewpoint of succulents through her art.

Tara has a B.A. in Painting from University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She has exhibited her paintings in galleries throughout the Bay Area, including Orangeland Gallery in S.F., Sanchez Contemporary Gallery in Oakland,  Marin Society of Artists in San Rafael, and Sun Gallery in Hayward. As well as Sturt Haaga Gallery in Los Angeles, Light Space and Time Gallery in Palm Springs, and the Museum of Northern California Art in Chico CA.

Kathleen King: Aided, Inspired, Multiplied

Mercury 20 artist/member Kathleen King presented a solo show at Oakland’s Pro Arts Gallery & Commons earlier this year and a catalog of the show was recently published. The catalog is 7 x 8.5 inches, full color, 36 pages with an introduction by Pro Arts director Natalia Ivanova Mount and interview by Leora Lutz. The catalog is available for purchase from Pro Arts at  proartscommons.org/store